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World War I MOOC

By The Cove July 30, 2017


 

Ever wanted to expand your knowledge of World War I? If so, we strongly recommend you consider signing up for the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) titled 'WWI Lessons and Legacy of the Great War' offered by the University of New South Wales: Canberra. The course delivered by Future Learn, is free, and requires approximately 3 hours per week for 6 weeks (certificates for course completion are also available). It is hosted by John Connor, one of Australia’s leading military historians, and a team of international historians.  

Why this MOOC? The course outline suggests the MOOC aims to compare and contrast the reality of the First World War - a costly and wasteful conflict, but one that ended in a decisive victory over German aggression - with our memory of it today as a war that was both senseless and ineffective. It focuses on the experiences of soldiers in the British, French, German and American armies, including those from the British and French empires, such as Australian, Canadian, Indian, New Zealand, Algerian, Moroccan and West African soldiers.   The course is presented in three parts:

  • Part 1: An overview of the Great War. Concentrates on the conflict on the Western Front, and explores the development of an unprecedented type of combat, trench warfare.
  • Part 2: The ‘learning curve’. Compares how the British, French and German armies attempted to end the stalemate of trench warfare by developing new technology, training and tactics.
  • Part 3: Remembering the First World War. Explores how the social and political landscape has shaped and changed the memory of the War over the last century, and how art, poetry and novels have contributed to that understanding.

  Consider enrolling in this MOOC, or registering your interest for when the next one becomes available.    


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The Cove

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The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the position of the Australian Army, the Department of Defence or the Australian Government.



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